New astronomy roadmap calls for huge, broad-spectrum space telescope

 


Astronomers are looking for a telescope that can spot the first distant galaxies that are older than the older galaxies of our Milky Way, known as cosmic microwave background,” said noted astronomer Dr. Joni Bobik, from Utah State University.

A new and expanded professional science roadmap out of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) proposed and endorsed by the National Science Foundation (NSF) calls for development of a new and future “fast radio galaxy” (FRG) Observatory. FRG is an astronomical astronomical astronomy instrument that can be used to determine the nature of the cosmos.

“Astronomers are looking for a telescope that can spot the first distant galaxies that are older than the older galaxies of our Milky Way, known as cosmic microwave background,” said noted astronomer Dr. Joni Bobik, from Utah State University. “To make this discovery, FRG will be large enough to run for many years, which is something to be excited about.”

The JPL Goddess proposal was supported by the NSF’s Young Scientist Program (YSP) Initiative 2020 and was presented at last week’s NSF-JPL Gabbard’s Astronomy and Astrophysics Virtual Meeting and Workshop. This roadmap is designed for NASA and the NSF to help design, design, build, and operate future “fast radio galaxies” (FRG) telescopes.

Gabbard’s is an observatory under construction in the Mojave Desert in California that will open in 2022. As part of “the robust support” of the JPL proposal’s (offering a roadmap), the JPL Amateur Radio Science club recently launched a project, Gabbard’s Planetarium II, to help public access the observatory site. A Slack marketing application from Slack said the website’s WII email lists are being sent to over 52,000 subscribers.

Gabbard’s Planetarium II website now has more than 10,000 email addresses eligible to send personalized messages to Gabbard’s website users. The email list is currently limited to email addresses. Email lists are limited. Please receive an email by replying,

2020 Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI)

2020 Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI)

2020 Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI)

2020 Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI)

2020 Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI)

That space program is a collaboration of the LSSTI Division at JPL. The problem scientists face with FRG radio astronomy is how they can study cosmic microwave background, a ghostly artifact that radiates from the centers of very distant galaxies. The FRG radio astronomy instrument is intended to illuminate the faint and faint microwave emission from objects outside the galaxies to better understand the early universe, provide additional observations for astrophysics, and provide insights into future astronomy’s research objectives. However, that may not be enough, and the expectation for a massive new telescope is to surpass FRG radio astronomy by possibly decades, NASA said.

JPL’s proposal for a Large Particle Observatory (LPI) proposed the launch of more than 30 radio telescopes between May 2039 and May 2041, which would create a new successor to FRG radio astronomy, as well as increased capabilities in observing rare objects. Although there are three very wide fields of interest, most of the public has already been overwhelmed with the very large scope of types of telescopes required to determine the microwave composition of our universe.

JPL’s proposal not only asks for an exceptionally large network of telescopes (about 12 times more than current FRG radio astronomy instruments), it also asks for two separate agreements (almost another one hundred new telescopes) to assist in its significant expansion. “One control agreement would permit an entity to construct additional telescopes. One would permit the larger system to cooperate with the multiple facilities. There are so many choices of how to structure these groups and control them, and this is too large, and too continuous, an order to be achieved.”

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